• The poet Vladimir Mayakovsky was a well-known fan of billiards. According to one of the legends, having lost a large sum once, Mayakovsky gave the opponent a receipt for the future fee. He was later pardoned, but the receipt in absentia became the subject of search for many enthusiasts.
  • Peter the Great often played with Pushkin’s great-grandfather. Peter the Great kept the table on which they played until his death, but later it burned down.
  • Stalin was an ardent fan of billiards, and often played with other officials. He started an unusual tradition – the loser had to climb under the table. Most often there was Khrushchev, whom Stalin ridiculed for his abilities in the game.
  • According to some sources, the color of the cloth is due to the fact that initially played by rich people and aristocrats, whose main hobby was golf and croquet. For greater convenience, so that the color of the cloth does not cause irritation, it was made green.
  • The game of billiards is very spectacular and exciting, so it seems incredible the case of the owner of the hall from the United States Joseph Thomas, who worked in the hall for 35 years and never played a single game.
  • The first woman to win the American Pool Championship was actually a man, but this fact became public only after his death.
  • British player Paul Sullivan set a world record. He shot more than 17,000 times during the day. This interesting fact is recorded in the Guinness Book of Records.
  • There are many superstitions associated with this game. Players often inadvertently knock a cane on the table to attract good luck, take with them lucky balls and in any case do not allow others to play with their own cane.
  • Despite its popularity in the USSR, professional gambling was punishable by law and banned throughout its territory.
  • The first sporting event in the world to have the status of a “world championship” was a game of billiards.